BRITISH HISTORY AND CULTURE


THE BATTLE OF NASEBY

Although the Magna Carta was signed in 1215, the Battle of Naseby (on 14 June 1645) has long been regarded as the turning point for the establishment of democracy in England, giving Parliament a right to a permanent role in the government of the kingdom.  

Read more

The Battle of Rorke's Drift

The Battle of Rorke's Drift was an engagement in the Anglo-Zulu War which took place on 22-23 January 1879.

Read more

The Magna Carta

Magna Carta (also "The Great Charter"), is often thought of today as the pre-eminent manifestation of constitutional protections for the common people, but it was not originally drafted for this purpose.

Read more

The Genius and Ingenuity of the British People

The Britain people are a nation of genius, inventiveness and brilliance.

Read more

The British Empire: Building the Modern World

The British Empire was the largest empire in the history of the world.

Read more

The Napoleonic Wars

In 1789, a revolution erupted in France which unseated the monarchy.

Read more

The Loss of the American Colonies

Thanks to the voyages of John Cabot, Britain claimed large areas of the North American land mass.

Read more

The Birth of the United Kingdom

On 22 July 1706, the Treaty of Union was agreed between England and Scotland, and subsequently the national parliaments of both countries each passed an Act of Union on 1 May 1707, creating a single supreme parliament formally uniting both nations under a single monarchy and a single flag.

Read more

The English Civil War

Upon Elizabeth’s death in 1603, she was succeeded by James I, the son of Elizabeth’s cousin, Mary Stuart, also known as Mary Queen of Scots.

Read more

Elizabeth I: England’s Golden Age

When Elizabeth I took the throne in 1559 AD, England entered what many consider to be her Golden Age.

Read more

The Tudors and the Reformation

Henry VII, the first Tudor king of England, was succeeded by his son Henry VIII in 1509 AD.

Read more

The Hundred Years War

Thanks to the Norman-French connection provided by William the Conqueror and his successors, the House of Plantagenet always held a loose claim on the throne of France.

Read more

Edward I and the Scottish Wars

In 1272 AD, a new king took the throne in England called Edward I (1272-1307), who became known as Edward the Longshanks.

Read more

The Early Plantagenet Kings

From 1154 AD to 1399 AD a royal house called the Plantagenets ruled England.

Read more

The Coming of the Normans

When the Anglo-Saxon king Edward the Confessor died in January 1066, he left behind no heir to the throne.

Read more

The Vikings and English Resistance

Anglo-Saxon England became the focus for a wave of attacks by ferocious Scandinavians called Vikings.

Read more

The Coming of the Anglo-Saxons

A number of Roman legionnaires and officials decided to stay in Britain after their service had ended.

Read more

The Roman Occupation of Britain

The Roman occupation of Britain led to enormous cultural changes.

Read more

The Roman conquest of Britain

The first Roman Emperor, Augustus, taking power following Julius Caesar, planned a number of invasions of Britain, following in his adopted father’s footsteps, but they were all abandoned.

Read more

Julius Caesar invades Britain

The Celts in Britain remained relatively undisturbed, warring amongst themselves, until the mighty Romans under Julius Caesar invaded in 55 BC.

Read more

The coming of the Celts

In 5,600 BC the Black Sea in southern Russia flooded and caused major migrations of Europeans in all directions.

Read more

The indigenous British people

Recent DNA and anthropological studies, as well as publications such as 'The Origins of the British', have proven beyond a doubt that the majority (at least two-thirds) of the present day British population are biologically the same as those settlers who first arrived in the British Isles towards the end of the last Ice Age.

Read more

Britain: The Neolithic Age

At the close of the last great Ice Age, Britain’s climate gradually improved, which permitted the early British to become more settled, leading eventually to fixed settlements.

Read more

Stone Age Britain

The Stone Age (Paleolithic Age) was a period during which man used weapons and tools made of stone, and covers approximately 99% of all human history, the usual consensus being around 2.5 million years ago to around 10,000 BC.

Read more